Author Topic: New member, researching the 1200RT  (Read 543 times)

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OfflineFahrradkäufer

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    New member, researching the 1200RT
    « on: 2019-02-04 02:15:22 »
    I've been riding for many years, exclusively universal Japanese bikes. I've been riding older bikes and was looking at something newer, mainly so as not to have to mess with carburetors. I also don't like chain drive or liquid-cooled bikes, so I'm looking for a shaft driven model with fuel injection. My search has lead me to the 2005-2013 1200RT. I've done some reading, and it looks like the 1200 is superior to the 1100 and 1150.
    What I'm interested in by joining here is to see if given my parameters if there is a particular year/years to avoid, or anything to look for when shopping for a bike.
    Researching the R1200 RT for a possible future purchase.

    Offlineslowvet

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      • Model/year: 2011 bmw r1200rt
      Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
      « Reply #1 on: 2019-02-04 04:28:21 »
      Welcome  to the forum! There’s a boat load of beemer knowledge around here and I bet they’ll answer all your questions. I came from the typical inline 4 and have adjusted nicely to my ‘11 rt.

      Offlinebicyclenut

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        • Model/year: 2010 R1200RT
        Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
        « Reply #2 on: 2019-02-04 05:59:25 »
        - 2005-2006 had servo brakes which some riders do not prefer (I understand it is like a power assist),have a difficult bleeding procedure and may be more expensive to replace the servo unit.
        - 2005 until late 2010 have a electronic fuel strip for the fuel gauge that is prone to failure, sometimes frequently and with a "zapper" fix that sometimes works.
        - 2010-2013 has the new twin cam version of the engine with a slight increase in horsepower and torque. Also some minor redesign of the fairing, dash and switchgear I believe.
        From my research these are the years you can find a good number of lower priced good quality RT's without getting into the newer liquid cooled boxer engines.

        Onlinebandytales

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          Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
          « Reply #3 on: 2019-02-04 10:56:10 »
          I've been riding for many years, exclusively universal Japanese bikes. I've been riding older bikes and was looking at something newer, mainly so as not to have to mess with carburetors. I also don't like chain drive or liquid-cooled bikes, so I'm looking for a shaft driven model with fuel injection. My search has lead me to the 2005-2013 1200RT. I've done some reading, and it looks like the 1200 is superior to the 1100 and 1150.
          What I'm interested in by joining here is to see if given my parameters if there is a particular year/years to avoid, or anything to look for when shopping for a bike.


          Unless you have a major reason not to, you should also really consider the 2014 onwards Wethed RT. It is a major step forward in many areas and about the same in others. However, there are many turning up at the right price now. The Wethead has turned out to be a very reliable machine.
          The general rule really works here with the entire RT range. The newer the model, the better they became.

          OfflineMEM62

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            Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
            « Reply #4 on: 2019-02-04 11:09:22 »
            Every new generation moves the game on. So, the 1150 will be better than the 1100 and the 1200 better than the 1150.
            I have the 1200 TC, the last of the air-cooled generation. I bought mine new in January 2013 and have no plans to change it. I recently tested the 1200 LC and most areas are improved over the 1200 TC but not enough to justify the cost of changing. In fact, I was out on mine the day after I spent a few hours on the newer bike and was struck by just how good my bike still felt. Sometimes, if you ride the latest generation of a particular machine it can make the previous version feel dated but I am still more than content with my machine. (But then I am the kind of guy that will wait for two or three generations of iPhone to come out before I upgrade my phone)
            You could argue that the twin cam, being the last of the air cooled variants, it the most developed and therefore has all the issues engineered out of it. Cynics will tell you that this is not the case and the truth is probably somewhere in the middle. I have had no major issues with mine but the minor ones have been disappointing. One of the heated grips failed and I developed an oil leak. (Yes, really, in this day and age, an oil leak! I thought they were the preserve of ancient British bikes.) I had a 1998 VFR800 that ran to almost 70,000 with no such issues.
            However, although they are reasonably well put together, we do not buy these bikes because they are the best built machines out there, we buy them because of the way they ride and as a distance machine they are hard to beat. They are comfortable, reliable (in my experience) and can also be a lot of fun. No machine this big should handle they way that the RT does. They are quirky and you will have to adapt to the machines' characteristics - something that I find adds to the satisfaction of riding one.
            A full service history is essential and buy on condition and mileage rather than age. Also, go for the SE that has all the toys. Buy a nice one, look after it and you will have no regrets.
            « Last Edit: 2019-02-08 11:20:13 by MEM62 »

            OfflinePickaxe

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              • Model/year: R1200RT LE MY 2018
              Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
              « Reply #5 on: 2019-02-04 11:26:21 »

              Welcome and happy hunting.


              Definitely go for as later model as you can afford and make sure its got a full service history, or one that has been maintained by a fastidious owner. The major step forward was with the 1200s that replaced the old 1150s, which are slightly under powered and vibrate excessively when revved hard. The 1200s gained more power and are significantly smoother without losing the characteristics of a twin. As someone mentioned, the later 1200 wet heads are the models to look out for if the budget can stretch.



              One thing to bear in mind is that whatever anybody tells you, BMWs don't  necessarily = reliability, especially compared with Japanese models. However, they can achieve significant mileages and be excellent workhorses when maintained correctly.


              The BMW R1200RT is a motorcyclists motorcycle and is a joy to ride.

              Regards


              Dave
              « Last Edit: 2019-02-04 11:28:37 by Pickaxe »

              OfflineBeagle

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                Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                « Reply #6 on: 2019-02-04 11:57:17 »
                Every new generation moves the game on. So, the 1150 will be better than the 1100 and the 1200 better than the 1150.

                I have the 1200 TC, the last of the air-cooled generation. I bought mine new in January 2013 and have no plans to change it. I recently tested the 1200 LC and most areas are improved over the 1200 TC but not enough to justify the cost of changing. In fact, I was out on mine the day after I spent a few hours on the newer bike and was struck by just how good my bike still felt. Sometimes, if you ride the latest generation of a particular machine it can make the previous version feel dated but I am still more than content with my machine. (But then I am the kind of guy that will wait for two or three generations of iPhone to come out before I upgrade my phone)

                You could argue that the twin cam, being the last of the air cooled variants, it the most developed and therefore has all the issues engineered out of it. cynics will tell you that this is not the case and the truth is probably somewhere in the middle. I have had no major issues with mine but the minor ones have been disappointing. One of the heated grips failed and I developed an oil leak. (Yes, really, in this day and age, an oil leak! I thought they were the preserve of ancient British bikes.) I had a 1998 VFR800 that ran to almost 70,000 with no such issues.

                However, although they are reasonably well put together, we do not buy these bikes because they are the best built machines out there, we buy them because of the way they ride and as a distance machine they are hard to beat. They are comfortable, reliable (in my experience) and can also be a lot of fun. No machine this big should handle they way that the RT does. They are quirky and you will have to adapt to the machines' characteristics - something that I find adds to the satisfaction of riding one.

                A full service history is essential and buy on condition and mileage rather than age. Also, go for the SE that has all the toys. Buy a nice one, look after it and you will have no regrets.




                Good comment. :)

                OfflineFahrradkäufer

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                  Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                  « Reply #7 on: 2019-02-05 02:08:41 »
                  Thanks for all of the good info & advice.
                  Researching the R1200 RT for a possible future purchase.

                  OfflineT6pilot

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                    Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                    « Reply #8 on: 2019-02-05 02:21:44 »
                    If you don’t want a liquid cooled RT, 10-13 would be in my opinion the best model
                    Jim

                    OfflineStratman

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                      Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                      « Reply #9 on: 2019-02-05 09:14:20 »
                      I bought a 2007 model a couple of years ago with around 30,000 miles on the clock. I have been to France and Italy on it. I found that the servicing was easy at home, once you work out how to remove all the panels (plenty of videos on YouTube help with that). A brilliant tourer for not much money and the electric screen is fantastic. 500 mile comfort, 56 mpg, loads of luggage space etc. The only downside to the weather protection is when touring abroad in +30 degree heat - you don't get enough cool air.

                      Offlinegogs01

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                        Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                        « Reply #10 on: 2019-02-05 10:43:31 »
                        I bought a 2007 model a couple of years ago with around 30,000 miles on the clock. I have been to France and Italy on it. I found that the servicing was easy at home, once you work out how to remove all the panels (plenty of videos on YouTube help with that). A brilliant tourer for not much money and the electric screen is fantastic. 500 mile comfort, 56 mpg, loads of luggage space etc. The only downside to the weather protection is when touring abroad in +30 degree heat - you don't get enough cool air.


                        I agree with all your comments but, having toured hot countries previously on four cylinder (mostly Japanese) bikes, a real benefit of an air cooled boxer is that it never blows super-heated air onto your legs !   ;)
                        My 4th R1200RT = 2016 (2017 MY) R1200RT LE

                        Onlinebandytales

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                          Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                          « Reply #11 on: 2019-02-05 10:52:13 »

                          I agree with all your comments but, having toured hot countries previously on four cylinder (mostly Japanese) bikes, a real benefit of an air cooled boxer is that it never blows super-heated air onto your legs !   ;)


                          And also true of the Wethead boxer. The hot air is dumped outboard of the riders legs.

                          Offlinehammo

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                            Re: New member, researching the 1200RT
                            « Reply #12 on: 2019-02-05 18:47:08 »
                            I was like yourself had the superbikes etc.etc, then at my time of life i wanted a comfortable cruiser after a few test rides i choose the 2017 1200RTLE , it has everything you require (if you want it ),i have done nearly 5000 mile on the bike now and enjoy every time i sit on it !!!! the only thing i would suggest is are you a long distance rider ? if so make sure you get a bike with good wind protection i changed the screen on my RTLE as i found the stock screen did not give enough protection but apart from that i,m very happy with the machine , good luck and enjoy !!!!!