Slow manoeuvres

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Chad
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Slow manoeuvres

Post by Chad »

Having ridden trials bikes for many years (clubman A class) I've always had a 'thing' about being able to manoeuvre my road bikes at slow speeds. It might sound odd but I practice this very frequently... On my drive. Sometimes when I return home from a run out instead of just positioning my bike so I can reverse it my garage, I have been known to do half a dozen full-lock figure of eights:-/  laugh if you must but I find this invaluable when filtering especially when two up & fully laden. Does anyone else practice this? If so where and how?
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stelyn
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by stelyn »

Generally most UK  Advanced Bike Groups / I.A.M  Clubs run  `Slow Riding Courses'  for their members,  to both assist them in developing  and furthering this particular skill, gaining confidence.  as well familiarisation with new Bikes ect
My local Club  is running 7 well organised half day courses this year,      ;)

The attached Link details  such a Course and the rationale behind it;

                                  http://www.ekam.org.uk/index.php/advanced/slow-riding
Last edited by stelyn on Sat Apr 18, 2015 10:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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steve.sharkey
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by steve.sharkey »

I spent ages on the Bandit doing this, I ought to repeat it on the RT... I was also advised when doing the CBT (I was very late to doing the test) to practice emergency stops on a quiet piece of road (weekly) which I used to do on the bandit, saved me a couple of times too! Especially with a bike not having abs (or linked brakes)!
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stelyn
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by stelyn »

steve.sharkey wrote: I spent ages on the Bandit doing this, I ought to repeat it on the RT... I was also advised when doing the CBT (I was very late to doing the test) to practice emergency stops on a quiet piece of road (weekly) which I used to do on the bandit, saved me a couple of times too! Especially with a bike not having abs (or linked brakes)!
Steve, it does pay to practice these slow  riding manoeuvres  now and again no matter what your skill levels are,  I have seen  advanced instructors ,  still run through these practices,  when  they have changed their Bikes so that they know,  how their new  Bike  will respond at a slow `walking pace',  inclusive of `turns'.  So find a quiet Store car park one Sunday Morning and give it a go.  Its a  good confidence builder and also part of the IAM'S  advanced test requirement - take care and  enjoy...... ;)
Last edited by stelyn on Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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BMjoe64
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by BMjoe64 »

Have to agree with the notion that slow speed practice is something everybody should practice.

I am finding it easier on RT than my last bike (Caponord) despite RT being heavier but I still need more confidence which only more practice will give. I also plan to load the luggage up with some 'ballast' to practice slow manouvering with full weight on. This essential I think before going on first tour on RT  in June.

Doing a u turn on the flat is one thing but doing it on a piece of road which has variable camber/slopes is still harder and uneven surfaces add another dimension all together.Trouble is often that after 2 u' turns and a couple of f.o.8's, the urge to shoot off at speed tends to take over.

But Chad, do you stand on the pegs and get the front wheel up like they do on the trails bikes?
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Chad
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by Chad »

Not quite Joe lol. To honest, it is easier to balance a bike when standing on the foot pegs, but this would look more than weird on an RT!  My technique is feather the back brake only (no front brake as it upsets the balance) & dip the clutch with one finger as necessary while keeping the revs low and constant. There are two techniques I use; if I want to go 'very' slow, I keep the bike totally upright. If it's a faster slow manoeuvre (I know) such as slalom or figure of eight, I lean the bike into the turn but I remain upright (and look up not down) Another good practice tip is regarding stopping; when I stop I always put my left foot only down, keeping the rear brake covered. To ensure this I sometimes have to upset the bike before it stops fully by counter steering so the bike has no choice but lean to the left. This way I know I'm in control and can predict the lean. This is essential when fully loaded with a pillion. We've all seen people make 'awkward' stops whereby the rider hops from right to left etc. I'm not suggesting my way techniques are all correct- they are just what works for me.
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stelyn
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by stelyn »

Spot on,  Chad.... ;)
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BMjoe64
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by BMjoe64 »

I have been told by loads of riders that doing some form of off road riding (not on an RT) can help improve on road riding skills, including slow work.
Do you agree guys?
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Chad
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by Chad »

BMjoe64 wrote: I have been told by loads of riders that doing some form of off road riding (not on an RT) can help improve on road riding skills, including slow work.
Do you agree guys?
I've ridden a little enduro and a lot of trials. Trials definately helps with balance and slow speed manoeuvres. However, I personally don't feel it helps in any other respect (such as positioning the bike for corners etc.) I used to ride with a police rider & and believe I picked up a number of most useful  'road riding' tips from him. (then practiced the techniques from then on). I believe if you start off right in the first place, and continue to practice the right techniques, eventually the muscle memory & instinct takes over, enabling you to fully relax on the bike creating a feeling like the bike and you are one. It's a bit cliché but when you look through a corner and the bike seems to just 'flow' through the bends without mid corner corrections, etc.  personally I think you've nailed it.
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Pope
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by Pope »

Interesting...


I don't practice slow skills. But I did the BMW Off Road Skills course a few years ago, and we did loads of slow speed control exercises.


We did a lot of full lock fig 8's and circles, however, it was much easier to control the bike standing on the pegs.


So, do you do it standing or seated (ooh er missus)?
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Maz12
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by Maz12 »

Also easier when it's not your bike and you don't have the fear of dropping it on the back of your mind
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Chad
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Re: Slow manoeuvres

Post by Chad »

Pope wrote: Interesting...


I don't practice slow skills. But I did the BMW Off Road Skills course a few years ago, and we did loads of slow speed control exercises.


We did a lot of full lock fig 8's and circles, however, it was much easier to control the bike standing on the pegs.


So, do you do it standing or seated (ooh er missus)?

On the RT I do it seated. When on off road bikes, standing.
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