handling

General discussion of the BMW R1200RT/R1250RT
yorkieboy
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2016 9:10 am

handling

Post by yorkieboy »

Stilll need to get my confidence with this bike going round bends. I felt at ease from the ffirst minute on the zzr1400. Not so with this bike. I know it due to the upright riding position and height of the bike. Think i need to find so rt owners and get so lessons
guest2360

Re: handling

Post by guest2360 »

It's probably more to do with the telelever front suspension. When you get used to that you'll  find it will eat most things in the bends.
User avatar
David.
Subscriber
Posts: 7973
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:29 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT (Camhead) 2012
Been liked: 328 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by David. »

yorkieboy wrote:Think i need to find so rt owners and get so lessons.
Do you live in the North Yorkshire Police catchment area, they have a few RT's.

Image

If you haven't already done any Post Test Training, you might get a run out with one of these guys via Bikesafe, http://www.northyorkshire.police.uk/bikesafe

Here's a few more to choose from, take your pick.

Image
Last edited by David. on Sat Jan 23, 2016 7:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
T6pilot
Posts: 574
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2015 6:12 am
Been liked: 1 time

Re: handling

Post by T6pilot »

I've found shifting down a gear, putting bike at higher RPM's allowing compression to assist braking and quicker acceleration coming out of curves. Never feels right grabbing a hand ful of brake in the twisties. Tires and tire pressure may contribute greatly to bikes handling. My last 2 bikes came with Metzlar tires, hated them, squirrelly handling when pressed hard. My new RT has them and switching to PR4GTs shortly
If your bike has electronic suspension, try the HARD position
Overall RT's have a good reputation for handling.
Jim
step2534
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2014 3:59 pm

Re: handling

Post by step2534 »

Yorkieboy, I agree with you its  a confidence thing.

You need to relax, slow down and enjoy then slowly speed up as confidence grows.  Its only a matter of a few hours, a day or so will do it.

Ive seen blokes who are tense it seems to make them erratic, smooth that's the way to go, let it flow.

The speed will come as confidence grows

Well that's my theory anyway
User avatar
7vwh
Subscriber
Posts: 241
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2014 9:16 pm
Location: East Yorkshire, UK
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT 2014
Has liked: 11 times
Been liked: 31 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by 7vwh »

DaygloDavid wrote: Do you live in the North Yorkshire Police catchment area, they have a few RT's.
They are Humberside bikes ;-)

On an aside T6pilot mentions the tyres. We've got mixed Z8s and Pilot Road 4s, with z8s on my own bike. I've spent the autumn and winter razzing around on both with no obvious difference. The 'boys' seem to prefer the pilots though.
Last edited by 7vwh on Mon Jan 25, 2016 1:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
David.
Subscriber
Posts: 7973
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:29 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT (Camhead) 2012
Been liked: 328 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by David. »

7vwh wrote:They are Humberside bikes.
Sorry for any confusion, I thought your Job Bike was with NYP, my mistake.

As far as I know, Cleveland & Durham use RT's & FJR's, NYP were using RT's in 2013.

Image

(The Instructor isn't showing a Brake Light & has both feet on the ground.)
Last edited by David. on Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
Our Gee
Posts: 760
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 7:43 am
Location: North Yorkshire UK
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT 2011
Been liked: 21 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by Our Gee »

DaygloDavid wrote: Sorry for any confusion, I thought your Job Bike was with NYP, my mistake.

As far as I know, Cleveland & Durham use RT's & FJR's, NYP were using RT's in 2013.

ImageRe: handling

(The Instructor isn't showing a Brake Light & has both feet on the ground.)
Please can you explain the relevance ?.
step2534
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2014 3:59 pm

Re: handling

Post by step2534 »

Police advanced, " when stationary, cover the brake" or it was when I was in.  Used to tell us "look like amateurs with both feet down"

But Ive been retired 9 yrs and things change.
User avatar
David.
Subscriber
Posts: 7973
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:29 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT (Camhead) 2012
Been liked: 328 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by David. »

Our Gee wrote:Please can you explain the relevance ?.
A RoSPA Examiner told me that, "I had a tendency to put my right foot down when stopping on the flat. I used the left foot whenever I was on an incline. This is the preferred technique for all occasions."

This photograph was posted on a Forum & then commented upon by a retired former Sgt. Police Motorcyclist & RoSPA Examiner.

Image

"What a splendid example. Stationary in the safety position, left foot down, right on the peg and covering the brake, both hands on the bars, picking up observation links and checking left as the lights are starting to change."
guest3074

Re: handling

Post by guest3074 »

step2534 wrote: Police advanced, " when stationary, cover the brake" or it was when I was in.  Used to tell us "look like amateurs with both feet down"

But Ive been retired 9 yrs and things change.
The Hendon Shuffle, only one foot down at a time  ;)
guest2360

Re: handling

Post by guest2360 »

All out of date.  Pull up, flick on Hill Start and that's it.  Brake lights on, both feet firmly planted. 
User avatar
k9doc
Posts: 692
Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2015 11:37 pm
Location: Chesterfield
Bike Model and Year: Suzuki VStrom AK7GT
Been liked: 4 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by k9doc »

I did some training about 12 years ago with an ex police instructor and he was teaching left foot down. Come to a halt on the footbrake (prevents forks diving on non BMW therefore bike more stable), hold on footbrake while stationary, Hendon Shuffle if first gear not preselected, and cover footbrake for first few yards moving off.
I noticed on a UKGser thread a few years later that he was advocating right foot down avoiding the Hendon Shuffle and that this was now the preferred method.
Personally FWIW, I use either depending on road camber/gradient and direction of turn if at a junction ie inside foot down. In the days of two up touring and fully loaded, I have to admit that both down felt more comfortable.


I notice in the pics above that both 'students' have left foot down.

Should we be too 'anal' about it or do what comes naturally?
Last edited by k9doc on Mon Jan 25, 2016 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Chris
User avatar
stelyn
Posts: 525
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 6:17 pm

Re: handling

Post by stelyn »

step2534 wrote: Police advanced, " when stationary, cover the brake" or it was when I was in. Used to tell us "look like amateurs with both feet down"
But Ive been retired 9 yrs and things change.
+1 step2534, I got marked down on my final assessment for having both feet down which I quickly corrected, but not quick enough for my eagle eyed Inspector. ( like you retired, and things do change ) My later, I.A.M course was always - left foot down and brake `covered' ? ;)
Last edited by stelyn on Mon Jan 25, 2016 3:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Only a Motorcyclist knows why a dog rides with his head out the car window
User avatar
David.
Subscriber
Posts: 7973
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:29 pm
Location: North Yorkshire
Bike Model and Year: R1200RT (Camhead) 2012
Been liked: 328 times
Great Britain

Re: handling

Post by David. »

stelyn wrote:My later, I.A.M course was always - left foot down and brake `covered' ?
It's also still the case for RoSPA, "You should always have the back brake covered when you are stationary, even on the flat."

What you do when not "On Test" is your choice, my thoughts are, "if it's good enough for Plod, it's good enough for me".
Last edited by David. on Mon Jan 25, 2016 4:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Post Reply